Bill Crawford


“THESE THINGS WE DO THAT OTHERS MAY LIVE”

Bill Crawford After 48th Combat Save

Bill Crawford



In Memory Of Bernard “Touch” Touchette
Touch was the FE on Pedro 39 on this mission
and is in the above picture
Aircrew (Chief)
distinguished-flying-cross
Distinguished Flying Cross

The Distinguished Flying Cross is awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the Armed Forces of the United States, distinguishes himself or herself by heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight. The performance of the act of heroism must be evidenced by voluntary action above and beyond the call of duty. The extraordinary achievement must have resulted in an accomplishment so exceptional and outstanding as to clearly set the individual apart from his/her comrades or from other persons in similar circumstances. Awards will be made only to recognize single acts of heroism or extraordinary achievement and will not be made in recognition of sustained operational activities against an armed enemy.


US Army AAR (3 Dec 1967)US Air Force AAR (11 Dec 1967)

CITATION TO ACCOMPANY THE AWARD OF
THE DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS
TO
WILLIAM L. CRAWFORD

Staff Sergeant William L. Crawford distinguished himself by heroism while participating in aerial flight as a HH-43F Helicopter Flight Engineer near Nam Can, Republic of Vietnam, on 25 November 1967. On that date, Sergeant Crawford subjected himself to hostile fire while engaged in the rescue of two American pilots and one wounded Vietnamese from a beleaguered government outpost. With complete disregard for his own personal safety Sergeant Crawford left his aircraft to aid the personnel while numerous mortar rounds, aimed at the outpost and the helicopter, were exploding in close proximity to the rescue aircraft. Sergeant Crawford’s courage and initiative under the extremely hazardous conditions were paramount in the expeditious accomplishment of the rescue. This perilous rescue and evacuation of the American pilots helped deter the hostile forces from intensifying their attack against the outpost, thus preventing further casualties. The outstanding heroism and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Crawford reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


I was the FE on Pedro 91 & after going in there the third time, I said this is crazy so I jumped out of the chopper & ran to the bunker & got the Marine Lt. Colonel to get out of there & on the chopper. A funny thing about that mission is when we were debriefing someone ask me if I was afraid when I jumped out of the chopper & ran to the bunker to get the Marine Lt. Colonel to come out. I said I did what? I was so scared that I just blocked all that out of my mind. We had gone in there three times with all the mortars & machine guns firing at us that I thought if we had to go in the fourth time that we wouldn’t come back out. When we landed & he ran back into the bunker I just jumped out of the chopper & ran after him & pulled him out & ran him to the chopper. (Bill Crawford)


The following is an extract from Bob LaPoint’s book “PJs in Vietnam”
The pickup crew flew Pedro 91 and consisted of
Captain Lawrence Conover, Captain Bill Haugen, SSgt William Crawford and Sgt Jerry Pearson.