Eugene ‘Sarge’ V. Ingram
March 25, 1925 – December 26, 2012

Eugene V. Ingram

‘Sarge’, Eugene V. Ingram 87, March 25, 1925 – December 26, 2012. “Sarge” died peacefully at home with family by his side.

He was a father, grandfather, great-grandfather, friend, mentor and hero.

A graveside service with full military honors will be held at Willamette National Cemetery on Wednesday, January 9, 2012 at 11 a.m. for family and friends. A quiet Celebration of Life will follow at the family residence.

Published in The Oregonian on December 31, 2012

~ GUEST BOOK ~

January 03, 2013
May you fly with the Angeles Sarge. Prayers and condolences going out to your amazing wife and family who miss you dearly. RIP SARGENT EUGENE INGRAM
~
Nikki Riggs, Oregon City, Oregon

January 01, 2013
The PJ’s from the 302nd ARRS scheduled tree-jumps twice a year, in the spring and fall. Gene was always very helpful in all of our visits. He was a fun guy to be around. He truly was a credit to the career field. Pete Long 1964-74
~
Pete Long, Chandler, Arizona

December 31, 2012
My deepest sympathy for your loss, I know you and your dad had your ups and downs Carolyn, but I know you loved each other so much. May he be at peace and no more pain. My thoughts and prayers are with you and your mom at this difficult time.
~
Ranay Hendrickson, Colton, Oregon

December 31, 2012
I was fortunate enough to have known Eugene Ingram not just from the rough, crass exterior that he exposed to everyone around him, but also through his unselfishness, pride, honor, and yes, even love and compassion that few knew he held inside. He will not be forgotten!
~
Gregory Teseniar, Washougal, Washington

December 31, 2012
Sweet peace is his, now & forever. Our hearts will always be warmed with memories of Gene. Deepest sympathies and many prayers for you and your family Carolyn. With love, Michelle & family
~
Michelle Rodarte, Portland, Oregon

December 31, 2012
You will be missed but never forgotten
~
Gary Teseniar, Aurora, Kentucky

December 31, 2012
I’m so sorry for your loss. My husband was Don Beevers. He worked at the air-base with Sarge…Jan Beevers
~
Jan Beevers, Gresham, Oregon

December 31, 2012
“Sarge” was my daddy! We didn’t always see eye to eye but we loved each other deeply. My dad has a special place in my heart and I am so proud of his life and all his accomplishments. He was a true hero & an inspiration to many! He was a very generous man to those in need. My dad had a heart of gold! I love you and will miss you!
Your only daughter,
Carolyn
~
Carolyn Ingram, Gresham, Oregon

December 31, 2012
“Sarge” was my dad! He taught me a lot about life. He taught me how to be strong, courageous, and generous to others. Although we were not always as close as we could have been, I know he loved his family deeply and was proud of me. I know I’ve always been proud of him and all he accomplished in his life. My daddy was a hero! I love you & will miss you! Your daughter, Carolyn
~
Carolyn Ingram, Gresham, Oregon

~ REMEMBRANCES ~
By: Felix McLarney

He and I were among the original unit and ART employee members of the 304th ARS. When the unit was stood up in ’57 it was not authorized PJ’s. The ART program came about in ’58. It wasn’t until ’61 that they were put in the manning document. Looking back a rescue squadron with no PJ’s seems way out of whack – Could be MACOM wanted to make certain we could operate the aircraft before letting folks jump out.

We found Gene refueling aircraft in SAC, got a convenience of the government discharge and direct enlistment as a MSgt. in the Reserve, hired as a federal civil service employee (ART) and assignment with the 304th ARS. As the first ever PJ assigned to the unit and PDX he was unique, a man with a mission that turned a lot of support folks inside out trying to get him the things he needed to standup his section.

Over the years he met many obstacles – i.e. CONAC had not arranged for jump training slots at Fort Benning while at the same time it was recruiting non-prior service personnel who needed basic as well as tech schools. With some of these non-prior assigned to Gene qualified as civilian sky divers others had no jump background. Gene was looking at, at least, one full year before jump school slots could be scheduled so he went to the Forest Service, got his non-jump qualified troops enrolled and trained not only as jumpers but as firefighting tree jump qualified as well. Completing Forest Service School was recognized as being qualified for the award of the military parachutist rating.

There were other hurdles which he met and overcame but there is one more important contribution to the military I think should be chronicled.

Gene left the unit to accept a civilian position with the Navy as one of its Survival, Escape and Evasion (SERE) instructors in San Diego. Gene had been one of the prison guards at the Stead AFB Survival School before having been assigned to SAC which made him even more qualified for the SERE program. This happened early in the Vietnam experience and as Gene reviewed the reports of those Navy pilots who had successfully parachuted he noted they could not continue to escape because they were stuck in the trees. With his AF and Forest Service jump experience he developed a rope let down and procedures that fit into the existing jump seat parachute pack. It was submitted as a civilian suggestion, accepted by the Navy and put into use across the fleet. He retired long before the SEA conflict ended so had no idea regarding the success of his innovation.

Integrity, Honor, and Respect
Some of the best things cannot be bought, they must be earned

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